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Archive for November, 2012

I just read a blog by a woman who was trying to decide whether to hire a doula in her second pregnancy. She eloquently captures that inner dialogue that I bet a lot of women have about this question: Is a doula a luxury or a necessity? In her blog post, she talks about her unease with consumerism. Do we need to buy things to be happy? Do we need to spend money to regain our confidence in our own birthing bodies? You can check out her blog here: http://mothershavefeelingstoo.wordpress.com/2012/08/29/doulas-necessities-or-luxuries/

In this post, I want to offer one idea in response to the Mastercard-buy-more-to-be-happy-consumerist problem we all live with in the First World. One of the problems with consumerist culture is that we mistakenly believe that the THINGS we buy are what gives us pleasure. In fact, the things we buy are things that real humans made, transported, sold. It is their WORK that gives us pleasure. When we buy services (massage, health care appointments, a haircut, or doula services) this is more evident than when we buy objects.

When we remember that it is human’s work that we are paying for, not just “things,” we can make wholly different choices about spending money. We can spend money and stop being a “consumer” if that makes sense. We can USE money to connect with other humans. So often we do the opposite. We use the fact that we are paying someone money for something like a haircut or cleaning our house or taking care of our children as an excuse to treat them differently than we would a friend or relative. We all do it. (Be warned: Sometimes when I try to treat someone I am paying for a service more humanely than they expect, they act as if I am crazy.)

As a doula and as a woman, I value so-called women’s work — no matter who does it, men or women. Long ago as a teenager learning about women’s work in history I vowed that I would pay childcare workers fairly even if they themselves did not charge a fair amount (which is true in our area. Our babysitter charges an absurdly low hourly rate and doesn’t charge for sick days: hers or ours!). A more accurate term I learned in graduate school is “reproductive work” — which is all the work that is (usually) unpaid if it happens within a family. It is the work that is necessary to reproduce ourselves everyday (taking a shower, mending clothes, cooking, doing dishes, gardening, etc.) and to reproduce another generation (childcare, etc.)

Because of larger cultural and global forces outside of any one person’s control, we are not able to do all the reproductive work inside families anymore. In my case, a big factor is that my parents, my husband’s parents, and all our siblings (eight in all) live far, far away from us. The closest is a ten-hour drive; many of them live across the globe. Many of my friends rely on their extended family for SOOO much help. My best friend here sends her two kids to her in-laws overnight every Saturday. [An aside: I can’t imagine having a night off of children to spend with my husband free of charge every week. When we do hire a babysitter, we have to go out of the house. I would love to stay at home and sleep at home with my husband with no kids in the house!] Just because I would prefer to have much of this reproductive work done inside my family networks doesn’t mean that is the best way to do it in 2012.

In general, I try hard to be thoughtful about using money and when I pay for reproductive tasks I find I am even more thoughtful than when I am buying plain-old commodities like new running shoes. I want to be thoughtful when I am buying running shoes, too, but I find it is easier to be thoughtful when I actually meet and interact with the human who is doing the work. Because when I pay for reproductive work (cooking, cleaning, childcare, doula work) I am asking someone to step into the shoes of my relatives. I am asking someone to care for me/my loved ones. Money is just the vehicle that allows someone else to have the time to do this work that I do wish my sister, my mother, my grandmother could do for me. But they can’t. So I am using money as a tool — not a substitute — for connecting to real humans.

It’s not a perfect solution to our consumerist culture. But being clear that money is really a metaphor for human time and that what we buy is human work — not “things” — makes me more thoughtful about my choices. And the surprising conclusion I come to when I think this way is that I want to spend MORE of my money on things like doula services and home-cooked meals and less of my money on things like technological gadgets.

What about you?

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