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Archive for September, 2016

Not everyone who is having their first baby had a wedding first. If you did, though, you have a natural window through which to peek at your relatives’ likely behavior — and your likely feelings about their behavior — at the birth of your baby. If you did not have a wedding, you may be able to think of another emotionally-heightened event at which family play a big role that will act as this window.

Mothers, mother-in-laws, sisters, and close friends are all likely to want to play a role at the time you give birth. I will focus mostly on mothers here, although for any mom-to-be it may be a sister or friend who lives nearby who is the focus of your attention. The question that pregnant women often ask their doulas is, “Should I invite her to the birth?”

If the woman had a wedding, this is where I usually start my questioning. Because it’s not about whether the relationship itself is good or bad. If you are considering inviting this person to your birth, I will assume the relationship is at least pretty positive. It’s about how the woman feels when she is doing something meaningful, stressful, and full of rapid decision-making in the presence of this other person.

Did you feel like your mother (sister/aunt/friend) understood exactly what you needed in the moment and was acting like an extension of yourself at all the wedding events? Or did you feel like she kept bringing you problems and issues to solve? Did she love your ideas and offer to help out anywhere? Or did she disapprove of your decisions (subtly or not so subtly)? Did she try to talk you out of ideas that meant a lot to you? Did you feel like her feelings enhanced and deepened the meaningfulness of your wedding for you? Or did her feelings about your wedding interfere with your own enjoyment?

 

Mothers can be just like us or very different from us and still be capable of offering genuine support. But not all mothers can offer genuine support. Their own needs get in the way of that.

Take a good look at how you felt about your mother (sister/aunt/friend)’s role at your wedding. If you have any lingering feelings of resentment or disappointment, I would strongly urge you to find a way to keep your laboring space free of their presence. Give her an important job to do away from your birthing space (making a birthday cake for the baby is a great job, for example). You do not get a re-do on your birth experience, so, like a wedding, it’s important to plan carefully. Don’t discount this treasure trove of information about how people are likely to act. Together with your gut instinct, this information about the past can usually tell you what you need to know about, “Should I invite her to the birth?”

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