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I got to speak at University of Michigan on Saturday to a packed room of what looked like 100 people or more. Wow! There were nurses, midwives, doctors, doulas, and pregnant women conversing together. Again, wow! It’s so great to be HAVING these conversations. Here’s an article from the University of Michigan website:

Hospital can provide safety net without pushing interventions; expert panel discussion planned at U-M March 24

Nadine Naber labored with a midwife, who guided her through her pain. Her husband was at her side, holding her hand, as she gave birth to her youngest son in a water-filled tub.

It was everything she dreamed a natural childbirth could be. But it didn’t happen at home — her son was born in the hospital.

Naber is one of many women who find that a natural hospital birth — a childbirth without medication or other intervention — is possible at Von Voigtlander Women’s Hospital at the University of Michigan. U-M has eight nurse midwives on staff and encourages women to set a natural birth plan that still offers the advantages of being in a hospital setting.

“I truly and deeply experienced what I would dream of with a natural birth, in every way possible, without any sense of it being medicalized,” says Naber, a 42-year-old mother of two and Ann Arbor, Mich. resident.

Naber says the natural hospital birth offers the best of both worlds: a birth plan without unnecessary medical intervention but also the safety net of the hospital setting.

U-M and Douglas Care will host a panel discussion, “Supporting Natural Birth in Hospital Settings,” on March 24, featuring author and professional doula, Cynthia Gabriel. Gabriel’s book, “Natural Hospital Birth: The Best of Both Worlds,” features a forward written by U-M’s Timothy R.B. Johnson, M.D. , who is professor and chair of the U-M Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

 http://umhsheadlines.org/20/natural-births-possible-encouraged-in-hospital-setting-at-university-of-michigan/

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Hire a doula because…

She will come to your house. None of the rest of your hospital birth team will do that.

If you are planning a hospital birth, one of the hardest decisions is “when to go to the hospital.” Your doula will come to your house in early labor and help you decide when is the right time to head to the hospital. Believe me, you will trust her judgment in this far more than you will trust your partner’s (unless s/he happens to be a birth professional!). This important decision can affect how you how your labor progresses and how many interventions you may encounter.

Most women go to the hospital TOO EARLY in labor! There’s nothing worse than getting sent back home in early labor.

Why do we go to the hospital too early? Because we all want to believe that we have progressed further than we have. When we have experienced labor for three hours, we want to believe our cervix has dilated to eight centimeters and delivery is immanent. However, especially for a first baby, this is unlikely.

An experienced doula can gauge your labor progress better than you can (unless you are an experienced mother). That’s not to say she knows your labor better than you do, but she has seen and heard other women in labor. She knows what active labor sounds like and looks like. It’s quite distinctive. There are some women who do not fit the usual pattern, certainly. But in my experience as a doula this is rare. Active labor sounds surprisingly similar for most women! I know midwives who can diagnose active labor quite accurately from listening to women during contractions on the phone. Having a doula help you decide when to go to the hospital helps you avoid getting to the hospital too early.

Why Going to the Hospital in Active (Not Early) Labor is a Good Idea:

Hospitals do not like to admit women before they have reached active labor. The hospital staff, and your doula, know that if you are in early labor you are more susceptible to having your labor slow down (sometimes slow WAY down!) if you change locations. Because we are mammals, our bodies are designed to slow or stop labor if we need to use our brains. Our bodies cannot tell the difference between having to use our brains to figure out how to escape a hungry lion and having to use our brains to answer the triage nurse’s questions. Either stimulation can cause our hormones to change and our labors to slow down or stop.

This is less likely to happen once we have made it to active labor (defined loosely as the cervix dilated to around 5 centimeters). Then, hungry lion or not, our baby is probably going to come pretty soon.

It is especially important to arrive at the hospital in active labor if you are planning a natural hospital birth. The later you arrive, the less time there is for interventions! If your labor is progressing at a leisurely pace, you do not have to worry about beating a clock or losing a favorite nurse at a shift change when you are at home.

Your doula helps you decide when it is the right time for you to get to the hospital. She knows what kind of birth you are planning and she can help you optimize your chances of achieving the birth you want.

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